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Venous Blood Collection
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Venous Blood Collection

General Tube Questions

  • What type of plastic is used to produce BD Vacutainer® PLUS Blood Collection Tubes?
    BD Vacutainer® PLUS Tubes are made of a special formulation of the plastic, polyethylene terephthalate (PET). This special formulation is extremely strong, dimensionally stable, and resistant to chemicals and breakage.
  • What speed and time should the BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection tubes be spun at? All non-gel blood collection tubes, including those that contain heparin, EDTA and non-gel serum tubes can be centrifuged at ≤1300 RCF for 10 minutes.  The BD Vacutainer® SSTand PST™ gel tubes should be spun at room temperature at a speed of 1000 to 1300 RCF for 10 minutes in a swinging bucket centrifuge and 15 minutes in a fixed-angle centrifuge.
  • What coatings layer the walls of BD Vacutainer® Plus Serum and SST™ Tubes?
    BD Vacutainer® Plus Plastic Serum and SST™ Tubes are coated with silicone and micronized silica particles to accelerate clotting. A silicone coating reduces adherence of red cells to tube walls. The silica coating can sometimes cause the inner tube wall to appear cloudy and/or filmy.  This cloudy appearance does not make the tubes unacceptable for use.
  • How are BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes packaged?
    Most BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes are packaged 100 tubes/box and 1,000 tubes/case (10 boxes).
  • Are BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes endotoxin free?
    No, BD does not claim that any of the BD Blood Collection Tubes are endotoxin free.
  • Do BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes expire at the beginning or end of the month? The expiration date on the tube label is stated as a month and year.  The tubes expire at the end of the month that is stated on the label.
  • How should expired BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes be disposed of?
    Local trash collectors should be consulted to see what the proper method of disposal is for unused, expired blood collection products.
  • Are BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes sterile?
    Yes, BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes have a sterile interior. Tubes are sterilized by gamma radiation.
  • Can BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection tubes be re-sterilized, for introduction into a sterile field?
    BD Vacutainer® Tubes are irradiated to achieve sterility. These tubes are sterile on the interior only. We cannot recommend re-sterilizing the tubes, i.e., ETO (ethylene oxide) or autoclaving, primarily due to pressure changes that take place during the re-sterilization cycle. Our tubes are under a specific negative pressure. During the re-sterilization cycle this negative pressure may be disrupted and therefore the tubes may not draw the proper blood volume.
  • Does BD offer any tubes that can be introduced into a sterile field?
    BD does offer a sterile peel-apart pouch (reference number 366401) that contains a 10 mL glass red top serum tube and 7 mL glass lavender top EDTA tube.
  • Does BD offer a plain plastic tube, without clot activator?
    Yes, we do offer both 3mL and 6mL plain no-additive plastic tubes that can be used as a discard tube when drawing blood directly from an indwelling line or catheter.
  • At what temperature should the BD Blood Collection Tubes be stored?
    BD tubes should be stored at 4-25'C (39-77'F).
  • What is the proper order of draw for the blood collection tubes?
    http://www.bd.com/vacutainer/pdfs/plus_plastic_tubes_wallchart_orderofdraw_VS5729.pdf
  • What are the proper number of inversions for the various BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes?
    An inversion is one complete turn of the wrist, 180 degrees, and back.  Tubes should be inverted according to the following recommendations:
    • SST and serum tubes – 5 inversions
    • Additive tubes (EDTA, heparin, etc) – 8-10 inversions
    • Sodium citrate tubes (blue top) – 3-4 inversions
  • What is a BD Hemogard™ closure?
    The BD Hemogard™ closure has a unique rubber stopper that seals BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes. It is recessed within and covered by a plastic shield to help protect laboratory personnel from contact with blood on the stopper or around the outer rim of the tube. The BD Hemogard™ tube closure also helps prevent blood from splattering when the tube is opened.
  • How do I obtain quality certificates and MSDS on BD Blood Collection Products?
    You can access most quality certificates (certificate of quality, sterility and conformance) and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) on the BD website, at the following address -  catalog.bd.com
  • How do I obtain package inserts on the BD Blood Collection Tubes?
    There is one package insert that addresses the majority of the BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes, entitled BD Vacutainer® Evacuated Blood Collection System.  This can be accessed at the BD website, at www.bd.com/vacutainer under the section entitled “View our product inserts on-line”.

Gel Tubes

  • What is the purpose of the gel in BD Vacutainer® SST™ Serum Separation Tubes and BD Vacutainer® PST™ Plasma Separator Tubes?
    The gel forms a physical barrier between serum or plasma and blood cells during centrifugation. It is important to note that after collection, BD Vacutainer® SST™ Serum Separation Tubes should be inverted five times, allowed 30 minutes clotting time, and centrifuged for 10 minutes at 1000-1300 RCF (g) in a swing bucket centrifuge. BD Vacutainer® PST™ Plasma Separation Tubes should be inverted 8 times, and centrifuged for 10 minutes at 1000-1300 RCF (g) in a swing bucket centrifuge.
  • What is the difference between BD Vacutainer® SST™ and PST™ Blood Collection Tubes?
    SST™ refers to the Serum Separator Tube containing clot activator and serum separator gel. PST™ refers to the Plasma Separator Tube containing lithium heparin and plasma separator gel.
  • What is the gel composed of?
    The gel is composed of inert components, which are part of a polyester-based proprietary formulation.
  • What is the clot activator in BD Vacutainer® SST™ Serum Separation Tubes?
    The silica particles that coat the walls of the BD Vacutainer® SST™ tube are the clot activator. Initial activation occurs when blood enters the tube and contacts the particles on the tube wall. To continue the activation process, it is necessary to thoroughly mix the blood and particles by inverting the tube five times.
  • Why do the inside walls of the BD Vacutainer® SST™ Tubes appear white and cloudy? Are the tubes still all right to use?
    The walls of BD Vacutainer® SST™ Serum Separation Tubes are coated with silica particles as a clot activator. The coating process creates a film on the tube surface that appears white and slightly cloudy. The tubes are fine to use. However, it is important to remember to invert the SST™ Tube at least five times after filling. This ensures adequate mixing of silica particles with the blood, which is required for optimal performance.
  • What is an SST™ transport tube?
    The BD Vacutainer® SST™ Serum Separation Transport Tube contains double the amount of gel compared to the regular SST™ tubes. This provides a thick barrier that remains intact when tubes are transported, thereby maintaining the quality of the sample for the lab analysis. It is intended for use primarily when specimens are collected and centrifuged in physician laboratories or other remote collection stations, and then transported back to the laboratory for analysis.
  • How soon after collection should BD Vacutainer® gel tubes be centrifuged?
    Gel separation tubes should be centrifuged no longer than 2 hours after collection.
  • Can I re-centrifuge BD Vacutainer® gel tubes?
    BD does not recommend re-centrifuging gel tubes once the barrier has formed.
  • Can the serum and plasma be frozen on the gel, in the original BD SST™ and PST™ Tubes?
    It is not recommended to freeze the sample in the primary blood collection tube, on the gel barrier.  The gel may separate when it is frozen and thawed, resulting in red cell contamination of the sample.
  • Can the BD SST™ Tubes be used for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM)?
    It is not recommended to use the BD gel tubes for any tri-cyclic antidepressant drug testing.  BD has done studies using the BD SST™ tubes for 16 other therapeutic drugs.  The white paper may be accessed on the BD website at www.bd.com/vacutainer under the section entitled “Library of Clinical Documentation.”
  • Can the BD SST™ tubes be used for trace element testing?
    BD has not validated the SST™ tubes for trace element testing.  It is recommended to use the royal blue stoppered trace element tubes for trace element testing.

EDTA Tubes

  • What does EDTA stand for and how does the anticoagulant work?
    EDTA stands for Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid.  EDTA functions by binding calcium in the blood and keeping the blood from clotting.
  • What is the concentration of EDTA in the lavender and pink stoppered tubes?
    The nominal EDTA concentration is 1.8mg EDTA per milliliter of blood.
  • Why do some BD Vacutainer® lavender top blood collection tubes contain K2EDTA and others contain K3EDTA?
    BD Vacutainer® Plus Blood Collection Tubes contain K2EDTA, which is spray-dried to the walls of the tube. K2EDTA is recommended by the CLSI (CLSI guideline - Evacuated Tubes and Additives for Blood Specimen Collection-Fifth Edition H1-A5, 2003) and the ICSH (International Council for Standardization in Hematology). BD Vacutainer® glass blood collection tubes contain K3EDTA, the liquid form of EDTA.
  • What differences can I expect to see in hematological parameters when I switch from BD Vacutainer® K3EDTA to BD Vacutainer® K2EDTA?
    K3EDTA is a liquid and will dilute the sample ~ 1-2%. K2EDTA is spray-dried on the walls of the tube and will not dilute the sample. Slightly higher results have been seen from the K2EDTA tube in some CBC parameters, but none of these were clinically significant. It is important to mix the sample 8 - 10 times immediately after collection to ensure all the anticoagulant is thoroughly mixed with the blood sample.
  • Can the BD Vacutainer® Plus Plastic EDTA Tube be used for routine blood bank procedures?
    Yes, the BD Vacutainer® K2EDTA Plus Tubes are intended for routine immunohematology testing, including red cell grouping, Rh typing and antibody screening.
  • What are the differences between the lavender stopper BD Vacutainer® K2EDTA Tube and the pink stopper BD Vacutainer® K2EDTA Tube?
    The differences are the types of closures and the labeling. The lavender stopper can either be rubber or a Hemogard™ closure on a plastic tube. Product 367899, a 6 mL plastic tube, and product 367842, a 2 mL plastic tube, both have a distinct pink BD Hemogard™ closure and product 368589 has a conventional rubber pink stopper.  The pink stoppered tubes have blood bank labels and are generally sent to the blood bank laboratory in the hospital. The additive is the same in both tubes.
  • What is the minimum and maximum fill volume in the EDTA tubes?
    The minimum and maximum acceptable blood volumes should be established by each facility, to ensure that accurate hematology results are obtained.  BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes are designed to draw the appropriate volume to ensure a proper blood to additive ratio.
  • Does BD offer an EDTA tube that contains gel?
    Yes, the BD Vacutainer® PPT™ Tube (reference number 362788) contains EDTA anticoagulant and an inert polyester gel.  The Hemogard closure color is pearl white and the blood draw volume is 5mL.

Sodium Citrate Tubes

  • What is the minimum volume of blood that should be collected into a BD Vacutainer® sodium citrate tube?
    BD tubes are designed to yield within ± 10% of the stated draw volume on the label of the additive tube throughout the entire shelf life. (CLSI guideline - Evacuated Tubes and Additives for Blood Specimen Collection-Fifth Edition H1-A5, 2003)
  • What are the recommended centrifuge speed and time for the sodium citrate tubes?   
    CLSI recommends that sodium citrate tubes be spun at 1500 RCF for 15 minutes to achieve platelet poor plasma (platelet count < 10, 000) and accurate coagulation test results.
  • What do the lines mean on BD Vacutainer® Plus sodium citrate tubes?
    The etched fill indicator on the plastic citrate tubes indicates the minimum acceptable blood volume in the tube.
  • With such low draw volume Plus Plastic citrate tubes, will we have enough volume of plasma for testing?
    The following bullet points demonstrate that there is enough plasma to perform coagulation testing in a patient with an average hematocrit of 45%.
    Tests in a 1.8 mL Plastic Citrate Tube Assuming a Patient Hematocrit of 45:
    • Total plastic citrate tube blood volume is 2.0 mL
    • Packed Cell Volume (PCV) = 2.0 mL x 0.45 = 0.9 mL
    • Subtract PCV from whole blood volume to get volume of available plasma (2.0 - 0.9 = 1.1 mL)
    • Allow 0.4 mL plasma to remain to avoid disturbing the buffy coat (1.1 - 0.4 = 0.7 mL)
    • This still leaves 0.7 mL of plasma available for testing
    • Automated instruments require an average of 100 µl per test for PT and APTT tests, 50 µl for Fibrinogen, and 20 µl for Factor Assays
    • This volume, 0.27 mL, allows for a repeat test, if needed
    For 2.7 mL Plus Citrate Tube Assuming a Hct of 45:
    • Total plastic citrate tube blood volume is 3.0 mL
    • PCV = 3 mL x 0.45 = 1.35 mL
    • Subtract PCV from whole blood volume to get volume of available plasma (3.0 - 1.35 = 1.65 mL)
    • Allow 0.4 mL plasma to avoid disturbing the buffy coat cells (1.65 - 0.4 = 1.25 mL)
    • This leaves 1.25 mL of plasma available for testing
    • Automated instruments require an average of 100 µl per test for PT and APTT, 50 µl for Fibrinogen, and 20 µl for Factor Assays (i.e., PT, APTT, Fibrinogen Plus 2 assays = 0.29 mL)
  • Is a discard tube needed if the only tube being collected is a coagulation tube?
    There have been recent articles indicating that drawing a discard tube is not necessary before drawing the sodium citrate tube. In the CLSI coagulation document (H21-A5) it is still recommended that the citrate tube is the second or third tube drawn. However, in the CLSI guideline for Venipuncture Collection (H3-A6) it states that for routine PT and APTT, the first tube drawn may be used for testing.
    It is also important to ensure a discard tube is drawn when a blood collection set is used and only a citrate tube is ordered, as the tubing may contain up to 0.5 mL of air that will be drawn into the tube and displace blood volume.
  • How can the 1.8 mL and 2.7 mL BD Vacutainer® Plus Coagulation Tubes be differentiated?
    The 1.8 mL tube has a light blue rubber stopper covered with a translucent shield and the 2.7 mL tube has a light blue rubber stopper covered with a solid light blue Hemogard™ closure.
  • What is the blood to additive ratio in the sodium citrate tubes?
    The blood to additive ratio is 9 parts blood to 1 part sodium citrate.
  • What is the additive volume in the BD Plus sodium citrate tubes?
    The 1.8 mLdraw Plus sodium citrate tube contains 0.2mL of sodium citrate, and the 2.7 mL draw contains 0.3 mL of sodium citrate.
  • What is the effect of hemolysis on coagulation results?
    Hemolyzed specimens should not be processed since there could be activation of the clotting factors. Lipemic or icteric specimens may also interfere with the instrumentation's optical system affecting the coagulation specimen result.
  • What constitutes a tube inversion?
    An inversion is one complete turn of the wrist, 180 degrees, and back.  BD recommends that citrate tubes be inverted 3 to 4 times.
  • How long should the tourniquet be left on for drawing coagulation specimens?
    Placing the tourniquet for longer than 1 minute can lead to changes in the concentration of coagulation protein in the plasma as well as platelet activation which can result in erroneous coagulation results.
  • Can the sodium citrate tube be used when a patient exhibits platelet clumping in an EDTA tube?
    Yes, the sodium citrate tube can be used to get an accurate platelet count if a patient’s platelets clump in the EDTA tube.  The platelet count from the sodium citrate tube should be multiplied by 1.1 to account for the different blood to additive ratio in the citrate tube.

Heparin Tubes

  • What is the source of the heparin that is used in the BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes?
    The heparin is derived from porcine intestinal mucosa.
  • What types of heparin are offered in the BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes?
    The green top heparin tubes contain either the lithium or sodium salt of the heparin anticoagulant.  Lithium heparin should not be used for lithium determinations.
  • How is the heparin applied to the tube wall?
    All of the heparin is spray-dried on the wall of the tube.
  • What is the concentration of heparin in the BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes?
    Prior to April 1, 2010, the heparin concentration is approximately 15 USP
    (US Pharmacopeia) units of heparin per milliliter of blood. The USP is not equivalent to the International Units (IU). The IU is 6.4% greater than the USP.
    As of April 1, 2010, if a sodium or lithium heparin tube has a capital N superscript alphabetic character following the word Heparin (i.e.HeparinN), the USP and IU are equivalent. You will also see a numerical change in the number of USP Activity Units as a result of the harmonization to the WHO International Standard. Please refer to the BD electronic catalog for details on the specific product that you are interested in. There are no changes in the design or clinical performance of the BD Vacutainer® Tubes with Lithium Heparin or Sodium Heparin Additives. This is a labeling change only.
    For more information, please refer to http://www.usp.org/hottopics/heparin.html
  • Will the sodium results be higher in the Sodium Heparin Tubes?
    When the Sodium Heparin tubes are filled to the proper volume, the sodium results will only be 1 to 2 mmol/mL higher.

Trace Element/Lead Tubes

  • What trace element analyses can be performed using BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes for Trace Element Testing?
    We monitor for the following metals in our BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes: Antimony, Arsenic, Cadmium, Calcium, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Lead, Magnesium, Manganese, Zinc.
  • Can the BD Vacutainer® Trace Element tubes be used for aluminum testing?
    We have not validated any of the BD Blood Collection Tubes for aluminum testing.
  • What additives are available in the BD Vacutainer® Royal Blue stopper trace element tubes?
    We offer trace element tubes with two different additives.  The plastic tube contains silica particles and can be used for serum analysis.  We also offer a plastic trace element tube with K2EDTA, which can be used for whole blood or plasma analysis.
  • Which BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Tubes are recommended for lead testing?
    • Venous collection:
      • The K2EDTA Plus Plastic Tube with tan Hemogard™ closure (#367855)
    • Capillary collection:
      • The K2EDTA BD Microtainer® Tube with Microgard™ closure (#365974)
  • Can the tan top lead tube be used for a CBC?
    Yes, the additive concentration in the tan top tube is the same as the lavender top EDTA tubes.

SPS Tubes

  • Where are SPS (sodium polyanethol sulfonate) tubes used?
    SPS tubes are used for blood culture specimen collection in microbiology. Eight gentle tube inversions will prevent the blood from clotting.  The blood can remain in the SPS tube for two to four hours before it has to be transferred to a blood culture bottle.

ACD Tubes

  • What is the difference between ACD solution A and B?
    ACD is available in two formulations.  Both solutions are comprised of trisodium citrate, citric acid and dextrose.  The formulations are as follows:
      ACD Solution A ACD Solution B
    Trisodium citrate 22.0 g/L  13.2 g/L
    Citric Acid   8.0 g/L 4.8 g/L
    Dextrose     24.5 g/L      14.7 g/L

Gray top tubes

  • What is the stability of glucose in the gray top tubes?
    The glucose is stable for 24 hours.
  • What is the glycolytic inhibitor in the gray top tube?
    Sodium fluoride acts as the glycolytic inhibitor and prevents the cells in the blood from utilizing the glucose.

BD VACUTAINER® Push Button Blood Collection Set

  • Where can I order the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set and the BD Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Sets?
    From an authorized BD distributor.
  • How are BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set and the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Sets packaged?
    Both the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Sets and BD Safety-Lok™ Safety Winged Blood Collection Sets are packaged 50/box and 200/case.
  • Can the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set (PBBCS) and the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set (SLBCS) be used with a syringe?
    The BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set and the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set can be used with a syringe when it is used without a luer adapter. The syringe will attach to the female end of the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set or the Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set. Once the blood has been drawn into the syringe, ensure that the safety mechanism on the winged needle set is properly activated. The use of any needle for the purpose of transferring blood directly from a syringe to a specimen container continues to be prohibited by Federal OSHA. The syringe should be attached to a device, such as the BD™ Blood Transfer Device, that meets all procedural and safety standards for blood transfer.
  • When and why must the air be purged from the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set (SLBCS) and the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set (PBBCS) tubing?
    It is critical to purge the air from the tubing of a blood collection set when collecting a sodium citrate tube for PT and/or APTT testing. A plain discard tube or another sodium citrate tube should be used first to purge the air from the tubing and allow a full draw into the citrate tube. Purging the air from the tubing is also recommended before drawing any additive tube. CLSI recommends that all additive tubes should be filled to their stated volume.
  • How much air is in the 12-inch and 7-inch tubing of the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set and the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set?
    The 12-inch tubing contains approximately 0.5mL of air and the 7-inch tubing contains approximately 0.3mL of air.
  • Does the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set (PBBCS) contain latex?
    No, the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set is latex free.
  • Does BD Preanalytical Systems have documentation about the safety efficacy of the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set (PBBCS)?
    BD Preanalytical Systems has third party, peer reviewed articles that demonstrate that the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set reduces accidental needlesticks.
  • What can I do if the audible click of the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set startles patients?
    Let the patient know, prior to using the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set,  that once they hear the audible click, the phlebotomy procedure is over.
  • Where is the blood visualization or flash on the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set (PBBCS)?
    The flash on the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection set can be seen directly behind and below the activation button.
  • When should I activate the safety device on the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set (PBBCS)?
    The BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set is designed to be activated while the needle is still in the patient’s vein.
  • What material is used to manufacturer the wings and tubing of the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set (PBBCS)?
    The tubing of the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set is made of Polyvinyl Chloride and the wings are made of Polyolefin Elastomer material.
  • Can BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Sets, BD Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Sets and BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set be used for intravenous administration of fluids or blood collection procedures?
    Yes, all of these products can be used to administer intravenous fluids for short-term (up to 2 hours) and for blood collection.
  • What needle gauges are available for the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set (SLBCS) and the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set (PBBCS) ?
    The PBBCS and SLBCS are available in 21, 23 and 25 gauge needles.

BD Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Sets

  • What are the uses of the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set (SLBCS)?
    The BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set is simple, easy to use, and is safety-engineered. The safety mechanism can be activated immediately after the blood draw and helps protect against needlestick injury. It is also offered with a pre-attached holder for added convenience and to help ensure OSHA single-use holder compliance.
  • Can BD Vacutainer® Blood Collection Sets, BD Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Sets and BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set be used for intravenous administration of fluids or blood collection procedures?
    Yes, all of these products can be used to administer intravenous fluids for short-term (up to 2 hours) and for blood collection.
  • I had trouble activating the safety shield of the BD Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set. What went wrong?
    Withdraw the BD Safety-Lok™ blood collection set by grasping the translucent yellow safety shield grip area with the thumb and index finger. Note: If you grasp the shield along the sides, you will prevent the wings from sliding back along the track inside the shield. The thumb should be on top of the grip area. With the opposite hand, grasp tubing between thumb and index finger. Push the yellow shield forward until the safety shield is locked in place and you hear a click. Discard into an approved sharps container.
  • Why do I need to hold the wings during insertion? Why can't I just hold the sides of the safety shield?
    Inserting the needle by holding the wings will give you a greater sense of control to perform the phlebotomy. If you hold the sides, the safety shield will slide forward over the needle when the point of the needle makes contact with the skin. Continue to use your current technique of insertion by holding the wings. Remember, after insertion, the wings are never touched again.
  • Why can't I withdraw the BD Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set from the patient by grasping a wing?
    The wings are attached to the needle and then to the tubing. Holding the wings will not allow the safety shield to be pushed forward and locked into place.
  • Is the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set (SLBCS) available with a pre-attached holder?
    Yes, the SLBCS is available with a pre-attached holder.
  • Does the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set (SLBCS) contain latex?
    No, the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set is latex free.
  • What needle gauges are available for the BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Set (SLBCS) and the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set (PBBCS) ?
    The PBBCS and SLBCS are available in 21, 23 and 25 gauge needles.

Eclipse Needle

  • Why must the pink safety shield on the BD Vacutainer® Eclipse™ Blood Collection Needle be gently rotated back toward the holder?
    The pink shield is gently rotated back so it doesn't obstruct your view during venipuncture and collection. The pink shield is attached to the needle to provide protection from accidental needlesticks. The shield is directly in line with the bevel of the needle and all collections are performed with the bevel in the "UP" position.
  • Will there be any change in my collection technique when using BD Vacutainer® Eclipse™ Blood Collection Needles?
    No. The needle itself is the same BD Vacutainer® PrecisionGlide™ needle that you are now using. The only difference is the added BD Eclipse™ safety shield, which provides protection from accidental needlestick injuries.
  • What material is used to manufacturer needles for BD PAS products?
    The needles of the BD Vacutainer® Push Button Blood Collection Set, BD Vacutainer® Safety-Lok™ Blood Collection Sets and BD Vacutainer® Eclipse™ Blood Collection Needle are all made of stainless steel (grade 304).

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Capillary Blood Collection

  • How are BD Microtainer® Tubes packaged?
    All BD Microtainer® Tubes are packaged 50/bag, 200/case.
  • What is the recommended order of draw for BD Microtainer® tubes?
    • EDTA tubes
    • Other additive tubes
    • Serum tubes
      (CLSI "Procedures and Devices for the Collection of Diagnostic Capillary Blood Specimens" H4-A6 Vol. 28 #25 September 2008)
  • Can you tell me what type of plastic is used to manufacture BD Microtainer® Tubes?
    The caps are HDPE (high density polyethylene) and the tubes are polypropylene.
  • What are the external dimensions of the BD Microtainer® Tubes?
    BD Microtainer® Tube with Microgard™ closure is 15.35 mm X 46 mm and BD Microtainer® Tube with FloTop collector is 9.85 mm X 52.07 mm.
  • What are the recommended centrifugation speeds and times for BD Microtainer® Tubes?
    BD Microtainer ® Tubes with gel should be spun at 6000-15000 RCF (relative centrifugal force) for 90 seconds and non-gel tubes at a minimum of 2000 RCF for 3 minutes.
  • Do you have any BD Microtainer® Tube for lead determination?
    BD Microtainer® K2EDTA with Microgard™ closure (#365974) is certified for lead. The background amount of lead is less than 1 ng per tube.
  • How much K2EDTA is in the BD Microtainer® Tubes?
    There is enough K2EDTA to anticoagulate blood volume from 250-500 μL. The average amount of K2EDTA in the tube is 1.0 mg.
  • How long do EDTA Microtainer® Tubes remain stable after blood collection?
    Specimens can be stored in EDTA Microtainer® Tubes for up to four hours at room temperature prior to performing hematological determinations.
  • Is there clot activator on the walls of the BD Microtainer® Serum Separator Tube?
    The BD Microtainer® Serum Separator Tube with Microgard™ closure (#365967) has clot activator on the walls. The BD Microtainer® Serum Separator Tube (#365956) with an attachable flo-top collector does not have a clot activator on the walls.
  • What are the volumes, tubes size, tube dimensions and additives for the BD Microtainer® Plastic Clad Micro-Hematocrit Tubes (361021, 361025, 361027)?

    Description

    Cat#

    Band Color

    Additive

    Length (mm)

    Inner Diameter (mm)

    Outer Diameter (mm)

    Approximate Volume (μL)

    Heparinized

    361021

    Red

    Ammonium Heparin

    75

    1.1

    1.5

    75

    Pre-Calibrated Heparin

    361027

    Green

    Pre-Calibrated    Ammonium Heparin

    75

    0.56

    1.47

    15 to fill line

    18.5 full length

    Plain

    361025

    Blue

    No additive

    75

    1.1

    1.5

    75

  • What are the puncture depths of BD Microtainer® Contact-Activated Lancets?
    The blue lancet (#366594) penetrates 2.0 mm and blade width is 1.5 mm.
    The 21 gauge pink lancet (#366593) penetrates 1.8 mm.
    The 30 gauge purple lancet (#366592) penetrates 1.5 mm.
  • Why should I use more than one type of lancet?
    Different types of lancets are needed to accommodate different needs, blood volume, and patient types.
  • What are the advantages of the BD Microtainer® Contact-Activated Lancets?
    The contact activation method facilitates a consistent puncture depth, and minimizes the likelihood of having to repeat the puncture. It covers only a small area at the contact point, resulting in improved visibility of the puncture site for the clinician. Its innovative ergonomic design allows for a more comfortable grip. The lancet automatically retracts into the device, which prevents the lancet from being reused and minimizes the possibility of needlestick injury. In addition, the lot number is laser etched on each lancet for easier tracking.
  • How much blood volume can I get from each BD Microtainer® Contact-Activated safety lancet configuration?
    The volume to be collected is always dependent on both the safety lancet and the patient.  The following ranges should be used as a guideline:

     Reference Number

     Color

    Estimated flow

    Application

    366592

     

    Purple

    Low flow

     1 drop of blood; up to 10 µL

    366593

    Pink

    Medium flow

    Approximately 1 hematocrit tube; up to 250 µL

    366594

    Blue

    High flow

    Approximately 1 BD Microtainer® Tube; up to 500 µL

  • Are BD Microtainer® Contact-Activated Lancets and Quikheel™ Lancets latex-free?
    Yes, all BD Microtainer® Lancets are latex-free.
  • Is there a weight (of the baby) to help decide which Quikheel™ Lancet to use (pink or teal)?
    The preemie (pink) lancet would be used on babies between 1.0 Kg (Kilogram) and 1.5 Kg, and full-size (teal) lancet would be for babies over 1.5 Kg.
  • How do I place the BD Microtainer® Quikheel™ Lancet on an infant heel to maximize blood flow?
    Position the lancet so that when you massage the foot, you will push open the ends of the incision.

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Urine Collection

  • Why use a BD Vacutainer® Urine Collection kit for urine collection when I can use just a paper cup?
    For simple dipstick urine tests performed at the collection site, a paper cup is acceptable. For urine specimens that need to be transported to the lab, the BD Vacutainer® Urine Collection Kit has a sterile interior. It is the closed system that allows fast, easy transfer of urine from the cup to a urinalysis tube, a no additive tube, and/or  a culture and sensitivity tube (C&S), and closed tube transport to the laboratory.
  • What is the preservative in the BD Vacutainer® Culture and Sensitivity Tube (gray top)?
    The preservative in the BD Vacutainer® Culture and Sensitivity Tube (gray top) is a combination of sodium formate, sodium borate and boric acid. The preservative helps to preserve and protect the level of bacteria present at collection. It is mercury free.
  • How long may the urine sample collected in the BD Vacutainer® Culture and Sensitivity Tube be held before a culture is performed, and how long is this sample stable at refrigerated temperatures?
    The urine sample may be held at room temperature for 48 hours before test results are compromised. Refrigeration will not extend the stability of the sample.
  • What is the preservative in the BD Vacutainer® Plastic UA(Urinalysis) Preservative Tube?
    The preservative in the BD Vacutainer® UA Preservative tube is a combination of Chlorhexidine, Ethyl Paraben and Sodium Propionate. It is a mercury free preservative that meets the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and American Hospital Associations’s requirements for a mercury free disposal environment.
  • How long may the urine sample collected in the BD Vacutainer® Plastic UA Preservative Tube be held before urinalysis testing?
    The urine sample may be held at room temperature for 72 hours. Refrigeration will not extend the stability time frame.
  • Does the UA preservative have any effect on the KOVA system?
    No, the preservative has been analyzed on the KOVA system for manual microscopy and there were no effects on the physical characteristics of the sediment.
  • Is the BD Vacutainer® Plastic UA Preservative Tube compatible with analyzers?
    BD has done studies on various instruments.
    The white papers may be accessed on the BD website at www.bd.com/vacutainer under the section entitled “Library of Clinical Documentation”.
  • Can the BD Vacutainer® Culture and Sensitivity Preservative Tube be used for routine urinalysis testing?
    BD does not recommend using the Culture and Sensitivity preservative tube for routine urinalysis testing. Erroneous results may be seen for several of the chemistry parameters.
  • Can the BD Vacutainer® Plastic UA Preservative Tube be used for pregnancy test?
    BD has done studies using the BD Vacutainer® Plastic UA Preservative Tube for pregnancy test. The white paper may be accessed on the BD website at www.bd.com/vacutainer under the section entitled “Library of Clinical Documentation”.
  • Can the BD Vacutainer® Plastic UA Preservative Tube be used for urine drug screens and culture and sensitivity tests?
    BD does not recommend using the UA Preservative Tube for drug screen and culture and sensitivity tests.  The no additive BD urine collection tube is recommended.
  • What type of plastic is used to manufacture BD Vacutainer® urine collection tubes?
    BD Vacutainer® urine collection tubes are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic.
  • Do you have a sterile urine transfer straw?
    This product is not sterile but we have a sterile urine cup with integrated transfer device. (#364975)
  • Are your BD Vacutainer® Urine Collection Kits considered sterile?
    Urine collection kits are not sterile. The cups and tubes have sterile interiors.
  • Are the bulk-packed urine cups considered sterile?
    These cups have sterile interiors.
  • What is the total volume capacity for the BD Vacutainer® urine collection cup?
    The BD Vacutainer® urine collection cup is a plastic cup graduated to indicate a volume capacity of 4.5 oz or 120 mL of urine.  
  • How do I dispose of used urine specimen cup?
    The blue lid is considered a sharp, and as such, needs to be disposed of in a sharps container. Dispose of urine according to your facility’s policy and the collection cup in a bio-hazard bag.
  • What is the recommended order of draw for urine tubes?
    Culture and sensitivity preservative tubes first and the urinalysis tubes second.
  • Do you have any product that will collect urine from a Foley Catheter?
    Yes, BD offers the BD Vacuatiner® Luer-Lok™ Access Device which can be used with any BD urine collection tube.
  • What is the minimum volume of urine that should be collected into urine preservative tubes?
    The acceptable minimum draw volume for a BD Vacutainer® Plastic UA Preservative Tube is 7 mL and for a BD Vacutainer® Culture and Sensitivity Preservative Tube is 3 mL.

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Accessories

BD Vacutainer® Blood Transfer Device and BD Vacutainer® Luer-Lok Access Device

  • What is the purpose of the BD™ Blood Transfer Device?
    The BD Vacutainer® Blood Transfer Device was designed with your safety in mind. This pre-assembled, latex-free, single-use; sterile device undeniably reduces the risk of transfer-related injuries while maintaining specimen integrity. The device meets all procedural and safety standards for blood transfer from a conventional hypodermic needle and syringe to a blood collection tube or blood culture bottle.
  • What is the purpose of the BD Vacutainer® Luer-Lok™ Access Device?
    The BD Vacutainer® Luer-Lok™ Access Device is designed for sterile, secure, and safer specimen sampling. This device provides the security of a threaded, locking luer connection—the patented BD Vacutainer® Luer-Lok™, that replaces a luer slip device. The product is also compatible with a female luer connection or needleless IV site designed for luer lock access.
  • What type of plastics are used to manufacturer the BD Vacutainer® Blood Transfer Device and BD Vacutainer® Luer-Lok Access Device?
    The holders are made of polypropylene and the hubs are made of polycarbonate.
  • What is the gauge size of the non-patient end needle in the of the BD Vacutainer® Blood Transfer Device and BD Vacutainer® Luer-Lok Access Device?
    Both devices have a 20 guage needle on the non-patient end of the device.
  • Which standard does the BD Vacutainer® Luer-Lok™ Access Device follow to ensure compatibility?
    The International Nurses Standard (INS) of Practice, under Infusion Equipment states: “All add-on devices should be of Luer-Lok™ design”.
  • Can the BD Vacutainer® Luer-Lok™ Access Device be used to draw from a Vascular Access Device (VAD)?
    Each facility should establish or follow their standards and policies when drawing from a Vascular Access Device (VAD).

BD Vacutainer® Stretch Latex Free Tourniquet

  • Does BD have a latex free tourniquet?
    Yes, BD sells the BD Vacutainer® Stretch Latex Free Tourniquet. It is packaged in a compact box that allows for convenient dispensing.
  • What material is used to manufacturer the BD Vacutainer® Stretch Latex Free Tourniquet?
    The BD Vacutainer® Stretch Latex Free Tourniquet is made of isoprene rubber.
  • Is the BD Vacutainer® Stretch Latex Free Tourniquet scented?
    Yes, the BD Vacutainer® Stretch Latex Free Tourniquet is vanilla scented.

BD Vacutainer® One Use Holder

  • How is the BD Vacutainer® One Use Holder packaged?
    The BD Vacutainer® One Use Holders are packaged in cases of 1000 and bags of 250.
  • What is the significance of the date on the bag of the BD Vacutainer® One Use Holder?
    The date on the bag is the date of manufacture.

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Molecular Diagnostics

The product inserts for these products are available on-line at: http://www.bd.com/vacutainer/referencematerial/

BD Vacutainer® PPT™ Plasma Preparation Tube

  • What is the intended use of the BD PPT™ Tube?
    The BD Vacutainer® PPT™ Plasma Preparation Tube (BD PPT™ Tube) is a plastic evacuated tube for the collection of venous blood which, upon centrifugation, separates undiluted plasma for use in molecular diagnostic test methods (such as but not limited to PCR - polymerase chain reaction and/or bDNA - branched DNA amplification techniques) or other procedures where an undiluted plasma specimen is required as determined by the laboratory.
  • Is spray-dried EDTA the preferred anticoagulant for quantitative molecular diagnostic tests?
    Yes. Spray-dried K2EDTA does not dilute plasma and does not interfere with downstream molecular diagnostic assay protocols such as viral nucleic acid extraction, gene or signal amplification or sequencing.
    • Liquid additives dilute plasma, limiting their use for quantitative tests. 
    • Heparin is not indicated because it can inhibit target sequence amplification during PCR.
    • ACD (acid citrate dextrose) will dilute plasma and can cause hemolysis. 
    • Serum samples are not preferred for molecular test methods.
  • What is the concentration of the additive in the BD PPT™ Tube?
    The reference number 362788 contains 9 mg of dried K2EDTA, and reference number 362799 contains 15.8 mg of  K2EDTA yielding a concentration of 1.8 mg EDTA/mL of blood when the evacuated tube is filled correctly to its stated draw volume. The tube also contains a polyester gel that upon correct centrifugation (1,100xg for 10 minutes, swing-out bucket rotor) forms a barrier between the plasma and most of the cellular elements, allowing for transportation of the BD PPT™ Tube without removal of the plasma. Only the inside of the tube is sterile. The tube is not pyrogen free.
  • What is the recommended storage temperature for the BD PPT™ Tube?
    Store unfilled tubes at 4-25°C (39-77°F).
  • What are the recommended collection and handling procedures for the BD PPT™ Tube?
    • The BD PPT™ Tube should be at room temperature (18-25°C) and properly labeled for patient identification.
    • Collect blood into the BD PPT™ Tube using your institution’s recommended procedure for standard venipuncture technique and sample collection.
    • After collection of whole blood in the BD PPT™ Tube, gently invert the BD PPT™ Tube 8 - 10 times.
    • After mixing, store the BD PPT™ Tube upright at room temperature until centrifugation. Blood samples should be centrifuged within two (2) hours of blood collection for best results. Centrifugation of a sample at a period greater than 2 hours may require validation by your institution or testing laboratory. Centrifuge the BD PPT™ Tube/blood specimen at room temperature (18-25°C) for a minimum of 10 minutes at 1,100 RCF (Relative Centrifugal Force).
      WARNING: Excessive centrifuge speed (over 10,000 RCF) may cause tube breakage and exposure to blood and possible injury. To calculate the correct centrifuge speed for a given RCF, use the following calculator. Simply enter two of the three values in the calculator and press the calculate button. http://www.bd.com/vacutainer/products/molecular/ppt/procedure.asp#forcecalc
    • To obtain an undiluted plasma sample, remove the BD Hemogard™ Closure and aliquot plasma into a separate vessel using a transfer pipette. NOTE: When using a transfer pipette be sure NOT to disturb the barrier with the tip of the pipette.

BD Vacutainer® CPT™ Cell Preparation Tube

  • What is the intended use of the BD Vacutainer® CPT™ Tube?
    The BD Vacutainer® CPT™ Cell Preparation Tube (BD CPT™ Tube) with sodium citrate or sodium heparin is an evacuated tube intended for the collection of whole blood and the separation of mononuclear cells. The cell separation medium is comprised of a polyester gel and density gradient liquid. This configuration permits cell separation during a single centrifugation step. The separated sample can be transported without being removed from the BD CPT™ Tube since the gel forms a stable barrier between the cell layers.
  • What is the rationale behind the choice of anticoagulants in the BD CPT™ Tube?
    • Citrate is a better choice than EDTA for preserving cell markers. 
    • Citrate is a better choice for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Heparin will bind to the calcium and magnesium present in the master mix for PCR reactions causing the reaction to shut down.
    • Heparin is a better choice for cell cultures, because the large amount of calcium present in culture medium can restart the clotting cascade. Other anticoagulants may cause clumping of the cells in culture.
  • Can I use the BD CPT™ Tubes for animal blood?
    The BD CPT™ Tube is designed for human blood. BD has no claims for animal use for this product.
  • Can isolated PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) be used for gene expression studies?
    We have no claims on the product for gene expression studies; however, the isolated PBMCs are of high quality for a variety of downstream analysis.
  • Can we isolate basophils or neutrophils from this tube?
    No. Basophils and neutrophils are below the gel barrier and cannot be accessed.
  • Can plasma from the BD CPT™ Tube be used for proteomic analysis? 
    We have no claims on the product for proteomics and the tube has not been validated for this application. Plasma from the BD CPT™ Tubes is diluted with anticoagulants and density gradient medium. To learn more about our array of proteomics products, such as the BD™ P100 Blood Collection Tube, go to www.bd.com/proteomics.
  • What is the order of draw when BD CPT™ are collected?
    The BD CPT™ Tube is collected after EDTA in the CLSI order of draw, but prior to any tubes containing liquid additive.
  • What is the stability of an uncentrifuged sample?
    For best results, centrifuge the tube within 2 hours, after blood collection.
  • What is the recommended centrifugation speed, time and temperature?
    Centrifuge the BD CPT™ Tube with blood sample at room temperature (18-25°C) in a horizontal rotor (swing-out head) at 1,500 to 1,800 RCF for a minimum of 20 minutes.  Note: Collection of cells immediately following centrifugation will yield best results. Alternatively, the separated mononuclear cells can be gently resuspended into the plasma for storage or transportation for up to 24 hours. After storage/transport, pipette the entire sample above the gel layer into a separate tube to perform cell-washing steps.
  • What are the suggested cell washing steps? 
    • After pipetting the entire sample above the gel layer into a separate tube, add sterile PBS (phosphate buffered saline) to bring volume to 15 mL. Cap the tube. Mix the cells by gently inverting the tube 5 times.
    • Centrifuge the tube for 15 minutes at 300 RCF. Aspirate as much supernatant as possible without disturbing the cell pellet.
    • Resuspend the cell pellet by gently vortexing or tapping tube with your index finger.
    • Add sterile PBS to bring the volume to 10 mL. Cap the tube. Mix the cells by gently inverting the tube 5 times.
    • Centrifuge the tube for 10 minutes at 300 RCF. Aspirate as much supernatant as possible without disturbing the cell pellet. Resuspend the cell pellet in the desired medium for the subsequent procedure.
  • What is the expected recovery, purity and viability of lymphocytes and monocytes from a normal donor?  
    Please refer to the package insert at: http://www.bd.com/vacutainer/referencematerial/

PAXgene® Blood RNA System:

  • What is the intended use of the product?
    The PAXgene® Blood RNA System consists of a blood collection tube (PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube) and nucleic acid purification kit (PAXgene® Blood RNA Kit). It is intended for the collection, storage, and transport of blood and stabilization of intracellular RNA in a closed tube and subsequent isolation and purification of intracellular RNA from whole blood for RT-PCR used in molecular diagnostic testing. Performance characteristics for the PAXgene® Blood RNA System have only been established with FOS and IL1B gene transcripts. The user is responsible for establishing appropriate PAXgene® Blood RNA System performance characteristics for other target transcripts.
  • Why is RNA stabilization important?
    Blood RNA levels change within 10 minutes after blood collection. RNA is a labile molecule ex-vivo and can rapidly undergo up-regulation (induction), down-regulation or degradation. The stabilization formula minimizes RNA change to capture an accurate in vivo snapshot of gene expression levels. The use of unstabilized RNA for diagnostic tests could result in erroneous gene transcript quantitation.
  • What are my isolation and purification options with the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube?
    The isolation and purification of RNA using the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube could be done using the PAXgene® Blood RNA kit either following manual or automated protocol using QIAcube instrument.  Please contact Qiagen at 888-387-2381 for additional information.
  • Can I use blood stabilized in PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube to isolate miRNA?
    Yes, to isolate total RNA including RNA longer than approximately 18 nucleotides use PAXgene® Blood miRNA kit, that is optimized for isolation of short RNA sequences.  PAXgene® Blood miRNA kit is for research use only.  Please contact Qiagen at 888-387-2381 for additional information. 
  • How can I learn more about the PAXgene product?
    Visit www.preanalytix.com, or contact a sales representative for more information.  
  • Where can I order the tube and kit?
    PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube:
    BD Customer Services telephone # 1-888-237-2762
    BD Catalog # 762165
    VWR Customer Services telephone # 1-800-932-5000 or www.vwr.com
    VWR Catalog # 77776-026
    Fisher Customer Services telephone # 1-800-640-0640 or www.fishersci.com
    Fisher Catalog # 2302101
    PAXgene® Blood RNA Kit: 
    QIAGEN Customer Services 1-888-387-2381 or www.qiagen.com
    Catalog # 762164 (PAXgene® Blood RNA Kit)
    Catalog # 763134 (PAXgene Blood miRNA kit)
  • Why do I need to use a blood collection set with the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube?
    A blood collection set should be used with the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube to prevent backflow. If used according to the instructions, there is no possibility of “backflow” during phlebotomy.
  • What is the recommended order of draw for the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube?
    The PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube should always be the last tube drawn.
  • Why do I have to use a discard tube?
    The discard tube is used to fill the volume of the blood collection set tubing so that the subsequent draw into the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube is the correct volume. If other tubes are being drawn, they can serve the purpose of a discard tube with the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube being drawn last.
  • What are possible reasons for short- or no-draws?
    • The phlebotomist has not waited until the blood stops dripping into the tube.
    • The tube has "pushed back" from the needle holder and the tube is no longer drawing.
  • Can I inject blood from a syringe into the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube?
    No. We do not recommend using a syringe to collect and transfer blood into the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube. This defeats the purpose of immediate stabilization of the sample that the direct-draw tube provides.
  • How do I collect blood using the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube?
    Please visit www.preanalytix.com to review the instructions for use: http://www.preanalytix.com/RNA_Instr.asp
  • What is the chemical background of the tubes/system?
    The tube and kit chemistries are proprietary.
  • Can the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube be used on animals? 
    We have not validated the tube on any animals. 
  • Will UV affect the sample?
    As for all nucleic acid samples, prolonged exposure to strong UV should be avoided.
  • Can I freeze the filled PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube?
    Yes. The maximum length of time that the RNA remains stable at freezing temperatures has not yet been determined. The available data indicates that the sample can be frozen in the tube at -20°C to -70°C without a loss in RNA stability for at least 50 months.
  • PAXgene® Blood RNA Tubes are breaking after I freeze the tubes at -80°C. Why? 
    Do not store and freeze tubes upright in a styrofoam tray as this may cause tubes to crack. Store and freeze tubes upright in a wire rack. If tubes are to be kept at -80°C, freeze them first at -20°C for 24 hours, then transfer them to -80°C.
  • Will the blood cells remain intact and viable after collection in PAXgene® Blood RNA Tubes?
    No. Blood cells are lysed immediately after collection in the tube. 
  • Can the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube be used to isolate viral RNA?
    No. The PAXgene® Blood RNA System has been optimized for cellular RNA.
  • Can I isolate DNA with the system as well?
    No. The PAXgene® Blood RNA System has been optimized for cellular RNA.  Refer to the Paxgene Blood DNA System
  • What causes the formation of the bubbles in the tube?
    The bubbles are a phenomenon of the reagent in the tube and do not affect the performance of the system.
  • How long can blood be stored in the PAXgene® Blood RNA Tube prior to processing the sample?
    The intracellular RNA is stable for up to 3 days at room temperature, up to 5 days at 4°C, or frozen at -20 °C to -70°C for at least 4 years. The actual duration of RNA stabilization may vary depending upon the species of cellular RNA and from donor to donor.
  • What are RNA yields from this system compared to other methods?
    The expected range of RNA yield varies from 4 to 20 µg per tube and varies donor to donor, but one can expect more consistent yields with the PAXgene® Blood RNA System than other methods with a given donor.
  • What is the minimum amount of blood that I can draw and still get good results?
    The tube is optimized for 2.5 mL of blood. A smaller amount of blood drawn into the tube will result in lower RNA yield. 
  • Can I use buffy coats?
    No. The system is optimized for 2.5 mL of whole blood.
  • Can I use bone marrow?
    No. The system is optimized for 2.5 mL of whole blood. Bone marrow specimens should be collected into the PAXgene® Bone Marrow RNA Tube (Catalog # 764114).

PAXgene® Blood DNA System

The PAXgene® Blood DNA System FAQ can be found on the PreAnalytiX website at www.preanalytix.com/FAQ_DNA.asp

BD Vacutainer® P100 tube

  • What is the intended use of P100?
    P100 is an evacuated blood collection tube with an integrated mechanical separator that provides a means for collection, separation, transportation and preservation of plasma to be used in protein analysis. This product is for research use only and, therefore, the use of this product for diagnostic procedures and patient management is strictly prohibited. Neither the clinical utility nor the performance characteristics of the tube as part of an in vitro diagnostic procedure has been established.
  • What protease inhibitors are present in the P100 tube?
    BD does not disclose the contents of the proprietary protease inhibitor cocktail in the P100 tube.
  • Why should I use protease inhibitors?
    If you are conducting plasma protein biomarker discovery studies and/or evaluating methods to standardize plasma collection and storage for long-term protein analysis studies, it is best to use plasma samples, which will minimize preanalytical variability, associated with proteolytic degradation. We have conducted extensive research describing the use of plasma with and without protease inhibitors.
    Many of these results are in our scientific posters and the Journal of Proteome Research article.  Please follow the link:  http://www.bd.com/proteomics/references/index.asp#p100
  • Why should I switch to plasma when I have been using serum for all my studies?
    We have conducted extensive research that demonstrates the overall benefit for using plasma versus serum for proteomics analyses. The clotting cascade involves the induction of many proteases, which will result in the degradation of plasma proteins.
    Many of these results are in our scientific posters and the Journal of Proteome Research article.  Please follow the link: http://www.bd.com/proteomics/references/index.asp#p100
  • Why does the P100 tube use a mechanical separator rather than a gel separator?
    The mechanical separator provides a solid barrier between plasma and cellular material, resulting in high quality plasma suitable for downstream proteomics analysis platforms. In addition, the presence of the mechanical separator will prevent re-contamination of the plasma layer with cellular materials when tubes are shipped post-centrifugation.
  • What is the shelf life and recommended storage for P100?
    P100 has a shelf life of 1 year from date of manufacture at 4°C to 25°C.
  • What is the recommended number of days to store the P100 tube after the package is opened and stored at RT? 
    There is no length of time that will affect P100 tubes that are left in an unopened pouch; they just need to use the tubes (left in opened or unopened pouch) within 1 year from date of manufacture.
  • What is the recommended order of draw when collecting P100 tubes?
    • Tubes for sterile samples
    • Tubes without additives
    • Tubes for coagulation studies (e.g., citrate)
    • Tubes with other lyophilized additives (e.g., BD Vacutainer®, Heparin, EDTA, Plasma, BD P100, or Serum Tubes)
    • Tubes with other liquid additives (e.g. PAXgene®)
  • What is the recommended procedure for blood collection into the P100 tube?
    • Center tubes in the holder, to prevent sidewall penetration and resultant premature vacuum loss.
    • Push tube onto non-patient-end (NP-end) of needle in one swift action in order to minimize premature separation of the mechanical separator from the stopper. Hold tube on NP-end during drawing.  If separator moves in the tube during blood collection, discard the tube and redraw.
    • Remove tourniquet as soon as blood appears in tube. Do not allow contents of the tube to contact the stopper or end of the needle during procedure.
    • Allow vacuum to be exhausted prior to removing the tube from the NP (non-patient) end of the needle.
    • Mix specimen with tube additives. For optimal mixing, slowly invert tube 8 to 10 times immediately after blood collection before centrifugation.
  • What is the recommended centrifugation method for P100?
    Centrifugation Parameters - Summary
    • Optimal centrifugation conditions
      • 2,500xg for 15-20 min at room temperature
    • Alternate centrifugation conditions
      • 1,100xg for 30 min at room temperature
      • 1,600xg for 30 min at room temperature
    • All centrifugations can be performed in either a 45 degree fixed angle or swing bucket centrifuge
    • Use the appropriate size tube holders and/or cushions suitable to accommodate 16x100 mm tubes with BD Hemogard™ closures to ensure a safe centrifugation environment.
  • What is the optimal recommended handling and transport condition for P100?
    For optimal stabilization and minimal preanalytical variability, we recommend that plasma collected into the P100 tube is treated as any protein sample:
    • Centrifugation – centrifuge the sample within 2-4 hours of collection using the recommended centrifugation RCF (g’s) and time.
    • Aliquot – aliquot the plasma in 0.5-1 mL fractions into suitable cryovials within 2-4 hours post-centrifugation.
    • Transport – freeze the cryovials at -70°C and ship on dry ice to final destination.
    • Storage – store the aliquots at -70°C.
    • Freeze-Thaw – one freeze-thaw cycle per aliquot
  • If this guideline cannot be met (e.g., aliquoting is not an option at the collection site, or dry ice is not available/too cost-prohibitive, etc.) can we still use P100?
    Yes, P100 will, overall, provide greater benefit for reducing preanalytical variability. If an alternate handling and transport procedure is used, we highly recommend that, regardless of the change to our recommended procedure, the identical procedures are consistently used at all times, across all collection sites. This will ensure reproducibility and minimize preanalytical variability associated with the use of different protocols.
    Best Practice – Immediate Centrifugation and Aliquoting
    For optimal results, centrifuge 2500xg for 15-20 min, within 2-4 hours of collection
    • After centrifuging, aliquot plasma (500 mL-1 mL), into suitable cryovials
    • Freeze step-wise from -20°C to -80°C
    • If shipping, transport plasma aliquots on dry ice, preferably
    • Store aliquots at -70°C to -80°C
    • When a sample will be analyzed, thaw on ice
    • Use only one freeze-thaw cycle per aliquot
    • Alternate Handling Scenario 1
      Post-Centrifugation Primary Tube Shipping on Dry Ice
      • If it is not possible to aliquot plasma after centrifuging at the collection site, prior to shipping, freeze the tubes upright in a wire or plastic tray (Styrofoam racks cannot be used)
        • Freeze step-wise from -20°C to -80°C
        • Do not place tubes directly in contact with dry ice when freezing or shipping
          • Use a packing system that separates dry ice from the samples (e.g., Exaktpak)
      • Once the tubes arrive at the lab, thaw on ice and aliquot the plasma  (500 mL-1 mL) into suitable cryovials.
        • Store at -70°C to -80°C.
        • Do not store sample in the primary tube
      • When the sample will be analyzed, thaw on ice.
      • Use only one freeze-thaw cycle per aliquot.
    • Alternate Handling Scenario 2
      Post-Centrifugation Primary Tube Shipping on Ice or at Room Temperature
      • If freezing at ultra low temperatures is not available at the collection site, and tubes can only be shipped at room temperature or on ice packs, ship the tubes upright, preferably, in a wire or plastic tray (styrofoam racks cannot be used), or wrapped singly in bubble wrap
        • Once the tubes arrive at the analysis lab, it is recommended to aliquot the plasma (500 mL-1 mL), into suitable cryovials, and store at -70°C to -80°C.
        • When the sample is ready to be analyzed, thaw a vial on ice or at room temp.
        • Use only one freeze-thaw cycle per aliquot.
    • Alternate Handling Scenario 3
      Shipment of Whole Blood
      • Shipment of P100 tubes which have not been centrifuged is not optimal
      • A greater rate of degradation of peptides can be seen in whole blood vs plasma samples
        • Greater risk of hemolysis of rbcs can result in increased proteolysis

    Regardless of the method of handling and shipping employed, always use the same method for all studies, at all collection sites, in order to maintain baseline reproducibility

BD Vacutainer® P700 tube

  • What is the intended use of the P700 tube?
    BD™ P700 is an evacuated blood collection tube that provides a means for collection, preservation and transportation of plasma Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This product is for research use only and, therefore, the use of this product for diagnostic procedures and patient management is strictly prohibited. Neither the clinical utility nor the performance characteristic of the tube as part of an in vitro diagnostic procedure has been established.
  • What is the additive in the tube?
    The BD P700 tube contains spray-dried K2EDTA anticoagulant and proprietary additives, including Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV), a protease inhibitor that protects GLP-1 from degradation in plasma.
  • What are the key points for a successful collection of the blood in the P700 tubes?
    Push tube onto non-patient-end (NP-end) of a winged blood collection set in one swift action. Hold tube on NP-end during drawing.
  • What is the recommended order of draw for P700?
    • Tubes for sterile samples
    • Tubes without additives
    • Tubes for coagulation studies (e.g., citrate)
    • Tubes with other lyophilized additives (e.g., BD Vacutainer®, Heparin, EDTA, Plasma, BD P700 or Serum Tubes)
    • Tubes with other liquid additives (e.g. Paxgene®)
  • What is the shelf life and recommended storage for P700?
    P700 has a shelf life of 1 year, from date of manufacture, at 2 - 8°C.  We have conducted extreme temperature studies; and the product is stable for a month at -20 to +40°C.
  • Can we purchase P700 through a distributor?
  • P700 is only sold directly through BD – Please contact your local molecular/proteomics sales specialist.
  • How is P700 shipped and how should P700 be stored?
    P700 is shipped by either overnight or 2nd day air at room temperature. Upon arrival, the kit must be stored at 2° - 8°C in the foil pouches. Any unused portion should remain in the foil pouches.
  • We are planning to use P700 for a global study. How should the product be shipped to our sites?
    The kits are stable at room temperature for up to 72 hours. If the kits are shipped to locations that will require customs clearance, it is advised that the kits be shipped on cold packs to protect against any customs delays. Alternatively, kits can be ordered by the sites through a BD regional office (North America, Europe and Australia/New Zealand). If the kits are shipped within the country, they can be shipped 24 - 48 hour delivery at room temperature. Upon receipt, kits must be stored at 2° - 8°C in the foil pouches.
  • What is the effect of storage temperature on the P700 tubes?
    The external packaging and product insert recommend storage of P700 in the sealed desiccated pouch, at 2°- 8°C, immediately upon receipt of the product. A situation may arise in which the product may not be immediately stored at 2°- 8°C upon delivery (e.g., the shipment may be left out for a period on a laboratory bench or in a receiving area). BD is currently conducting studies on P700 to determine the effect of storage temperatures, outside the recommended range of 2°- 8°C, on additive stability.
    An internal stress protocol tested the stability of the P700 additive at temperature extremes of -20°C and 40°C. Preliminary data indicates that the effectiveness of the P700 additive to inhibit DPP-IV activity is not compromised in tubes stored for one month inside the sealed desiccated pouch, at -20°C and 40°C.

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