Insulin syringe FAQ

Previous 1 2 Next
Q.

Where can I purchase BD insulin syringes, and what do they cost?

A.

All of our products are available at stores and pharmacies. If a particular item is not available, you can order it through the pharmacist. Prices are set at the retail level and vary from store to store.

Q.

Does Medicare cover the cost of BD insulin syringes?

A.

Check your local Social Security office for this information.

Q.

How are BD insulin syringes sterilized?

A.

Using cobalt irradiation. Sterilization is the last process before shipping. The insulin syringes are already packed in their poly bags and boxes.

Q.

Can BD insulin syringes be used for other types of medications?

A.

Your doctor or pharmacist should prescribe the proper type of syringe to be used for your medication.

Q.

Do insulin syringes expire?

A.

Yes, they have a five-year shelf life. They should always be stored in a temperate, dry area.

Q.

Can insulin syringes be pre-filled?

A.

BD does not recommend that any of our insulin syringes be pre-filled more than a few minutes before the injection. No studies have conclusively determined the safety or risks associated with this practice.

Q.

How do I properly dispose of insulin syringes?

A.

In many cases, local communities establish disposal rules. So first, check with your town or trash removal company on what they recommend for the safe disposal of used insulin syringes. A good place to call may be your local health department. The following guidelines may be helpful:

  • Never throw loose insulin syringes into the trash. If you are disposing of your own insulin syringe, clip the needle with a needle-clipping device such as the BD Safe-Clip needle storage device, which you can order at your pharmacy.
  • Never handle someone else's insulin syringe unless a healthcare professional trains you in proper injection technique and disposal. If you inject someone else or dispose of their insulin syringe, use extreme caution to avoid needlesticks, which can transmit serious and even grave infections.
  • Never recap or destroy a needle that has been used by someone else. Immediately after the injection, place the used insulin syringe, still intact, in a safe container.
  • Put the used insulin syringe into a BD home sharps container, or check with your local sanitation or health department regarding rules on properly disposing of used insulin syringes and sharps containers. Keep this container away from children. When the container is full, seal the lid securely and dispose of it properly.
  • Never dispose of used insulin syringes or other medical waste in recyclable trash. Insulin syringes are not recyclable.

Q.

Can insulin syringes be reused?

A.

BD insulin syringes are designed for single use only, and are clearly labeled as such. Today's insulin needle is thinner and more delicate for greater comfort, so needle reuse can damage the tip and cause injury.

Q.

What is the difference between 28-G, 30-G and 31-G needles?

A.

The higher the number, the thinner the needle. So the 31-G needle is the thinnest needle available on an insulin syringe. The 30-G needle is thinner than the 28-G alternative. BD offers the 31-G size in our 6-mm and 8-mm needles.

Q.

Why is the needle length important?

A.

Clinical studies have proven that short needles like the BD insulin syringe with a 6mm needle reduce the risk of injecting into the muscle.1 Avoiding injection into the muscle is important for the body to consistently absorb insulin and for patients to manage their blood glucose levels.2

Previous 1 2 Next

 

References
  1. Gibney MA, Arce CH, Byron KJ, Hirsch LJ. Skin and subcutaneous adipose layer thickness in adults with diabetes at sites used for insulin injections: implications for needle length recommendations. Curr Med Res Opin. 2010;26(6):1519-1530.
  2. Frid AH, Kreugel G, Grassi G, et al. New insulin delivery recommendations. Mayo Clin Proc. 2016;91(9):1231-1255.